The Generalizing Specialist: The Key To Success

Generalizing specialist

A generalizing specialist is simply someone who is multi-skilled. Such an individual can be a specialist in one or more technical disciplines while at the same time actively seeks to expand their skill set, which spans across different areas besides their present specialties. Generalizing specialists are also referred to as cross-functional developers, multi-disciplinary developers, and versatilists.

While they can become more skilled with time, don’t mistake them to be super skilled in every discipline. However, their technical knowledge and general software development knowledge, as well as a good understanding of their relevant business domains, can be critical to getting things done in real-time. The person can easily be redeployed based on the changes in business strategy or other necessary requirements to remain competitive.

Benefits being a generalizing specialist

We live in a fast-changing industry, where being a specialist in just a single discipline alone may not cut it in the larger scheme of things. Since generalizing specialists have knowledge on a broad range of issues, they can see the bigger picture and help make better decisions for greater productivity. As such, the available job opportunities will likely be more compared to specialists. Better yet, you will be able to attract better job offers.

Importance of generalizing specialists

Generalizing specialists are essential to developing high-performing agile teams in companies, and here are some of the reasons they are considered the key to success.

• Better collaboration

While a company will have different departments, they will be connected with others and geared towards accomplishing the same end goal. Communication and collaboration within the teams involved are important elements to achieving that goal, and this is something most specialists aren’t good at. When you don’t have a good understanding of how everything fits together, it’s very easy to look down on what your teammates are doing. Working together effectively might prove a challenging task.

Generalizing specialists are more likely to appreciate the work of others simply because they have a good grasp of different technical and domain disciplines. Their background allows them to understand the issues teammates are trying to find solutions to.

• Improved flexibility

The IT industry, by its very nature, faces significant changes that serious businesses must comply with to remain relevant. With a generalizing specialist, dynamic transition and allocation of the new tasks wouldn’t be a huge problem. Things would look quite different if a team is built of specialists that are just accustomed to doing the same type of tasks over and over again. In fact, this is considered to be risky, as it can result in productivity loss.

• Increased efficiency

Generalizing specialists bring less dependency, which can go a long way in increasing efficiency and productivity. The problem when working with specialists is that they can easily become bottlenecks, especially when they have a lot on their plate. There’s a good chance that multiple development teams will be looking up to the specialist, and this can negatively affect the overall team efficiency.

Conclusion

Generalizing specialists are surely taking over. There’s room for some specialists within IT departments, but as things look at the moment, more departments are moving towards becoming more agile. It’s not unlikely to see only a few specialists survive in the information technology industry over time.

Why Unit Testing is Important

Whenever a new application is in development, unit testing is a vital part of the process and is typically performed by the developer. During this process, sections of code are isolated at a time and are systematically checked to ensure correctness, efficiency, and quality. There are numerous benefits to unit testing, several of which are outlined below.

1. Maximizing Agile Programming and Refactoring

During the coding process, a programmer has to keep in mind a myriad of factors to ensure that the final product correct and as lightweight, as is possible for it to be. However, the programmer also needs to make certain that if changes become necessary, refactoring can be safely and easily done.

Unit testing is the simplest way to assist in making for agile programming and refactoring because the isolated sections of code have already been tested for accuracy and help to minimize refactoring risks.

2. Find and Eliminate Any Bugs Early in the Process

Ultimately, the goal is to find no bugs and no issues to correct, right? But unit testing is there to ensure that any existing bugs are found early on so that they can be addressed and corrected before additional coding is layered on. While it might not feel like a positive thing to have a unit test reveal a problem, it’s good that it’s catching the issue now so that the bug doesn’t affect the final product.

3. Document Any and All Changes

Unit testing provides documentation for each section of coding that has been separated, allowing those who haven’t already directly worked with the code to locate and understand each individual section as necessary. This is invaluable in helping developers understand unit APIs without too much hassle.

4. Reduce Development Costs

As one can imagine, fixing problems after the product is complete is both time-consuming and costly. Not only do you have to sort back through a fully coded application’s worth of material, any bugs which may have been compounded and repeated throughout the application. Unit testing helps not only limit the amount of work that needs to be done after the application is completed it also reduces the time it takes to fix errors because it prevents developers from having to fix the same problem more than once.

5. Assists in Planning

Thanks to the documentation aspect of unit testing, developers are forced to think through the design of each individual section of code so that its function is determined before it’s written. This can prevent redundancies, incomplete sections, and nonsensical functions because it encourages better planning. Developers who implement unit testing in their applications will ultimately improve their creative and coding abilities thanks to this aspect of the process.

Conclusion

Unit testing is absolutely vital to the development process. It streamlines the debugging process and makes it more efficient, saves on time and costs for the developers, and even helps developers and programmers improve their craft through strategic planning. Without unit testing, people would inevitably wind up spending far more time on correcting problems within the code, which is both inefficient and incredibly frustrating. Using unit tests is a must in the development of any application.

Related References

Denodo Data Catalog Roles

The denodo catalog provides the data governance and self-service capabilities to supplement the denodo Virtual DataPort (VDP) core capabilities. Six roles provide the ability to assign or deny capabilities with the denodo data catalog and supplement the database, row, and column security and permissions of denodo Virtual DataPort (VDP).

The Tasks The Roles Can PerformDenodo Data Catalog Role Name
Assign categories, tags and custom properties groups to views and web services.data_catalog_classifier
Edit views, web services, and databases. Create, edit and delete tags, categories, custom properties groups, and custom properties.data_catalog_editor
Can do the same as a user with the roles “data_catalog_editor” and “data_catalog_classifier”.data_catalog_manager
Configure personalization options and content search.data_catalog_content_admin
This role can perform any action of all the other data catalog roles.data_catalog_admin
The exporter role can export the results of a query from the Denodo Data Catalog.data_catalog_exporter
denodo Virtualization
denodo Virtualization

Related References

denodo > User Manuals > Denodo Platform New Features Guide

denodo > User Manuals > Data Catalog Guide > Administration

Quote – Doing The Work Yourself

Writing and The Written Word

The wise man will commit no business of importance to a proxy when he may do it himself.

— Roger L’Estrange

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Denodo Model Best Practices For Creation of Associations

What Are Denodo Associations?

In denodo associations follow the same concept as modeling tools, which can be described as an ‘on-demand join.’

Where Should Associations Be Created In the Denodo Model?

You don’t necessarily need to define an Association at every level; usually, the best practice is to apply associations at the following points:

  • On final views published for data consumers, indicating relationships between related views; Especially, on published web services.
  • On the component views below, any derived view that brings together disparate (dissimilar) data sources.  The associations should be defined as Referential Constraints whenever appropriate to aid the optimization engine.
  • On the component views below, any derived view that joins a “Base View from Query” with standard views, since Base Views from Query cannot be rewritten by the denodo optimization engine.  Often Base Views from Query create performance bottlenecks.

These best practices should cover the majority scenarios; beyond these guidelines, it is best to take an ad-hoc approach to create Associations when you see a specific performance/optimization.

Why Are Associations important in Denodo?

In a nutshell, associations performance and the efficiency of the denodo execution optimizer along with other model metadata, such as:  

  • The SQL of the view(s)
  • Table metadata (Table Keys {PK, FK), Virtual Partitions…etc.)
  • Data statistics, which are used by the Cost Based Optimizer (CBO)

Related References

Associations in Denodo

Importing Associations And Joins From A Database Schema in Denodo

A coworker recently asked a question as to whether denodo generated joins automatically from source RDBMS database schema.  After searching, a few snippets of information became obvious.  First, that the subject of inheriting join properties was broader than joins and needed to in modeling associations (joins on demand). Second, that there were some denodo design best practices to be considered to optimize associations.

Does Denodo Automatically Generate Joins From the Source System?

After some research, the short answer is no.

Can Denodo Inherit Accusations From A Logical Model?

The short answer is yes. 

Denodo bridges allow models to be passed to and from other modeling tools, it is possible to have the association build automatically, using the top-down approach design approach and importing a model, at the Interface View level, which is the topmost level of the top-down design process. 

However, below the Interface view level, associations and or joins are created manually by the developer.

Where Should Associations Be Created?

You don’t necessarily need to define an Association at every level, usually, the best practice is to apply associations at following points:

These best practices should cover the majority scenarios, beyond these guidelines it is best to take an ad-hoc approach to create Associations when you see a specific performance/optimization.

Related References

Associations in Denodo

What is Power?

Writing and The Written Word

First and foremost, power is personal. Our perception of a situation has much to do with our ability to affect a situation. Therefore, power is each person’s ability to influence a situation. When a person has no ability to influence their situation (even, if as a result of an inaccurate personal belief), they have no power.

Definition of Power

Power is each person’s ability and willingness to influence a situation.

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