Using Logical Data Lakes

Today, data-driven decision making is at the center of all things. The emergence of data science and machine learning has further reinforced the importance of data as the most critical commodity in today’s world. From FAAMG (the biggest five tech companies: Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, and Google) to governments and non-profits, everyone is busy leveraging the power of data to achieve final goals. Unfortunately, this growing demand for data has exposed the inefficiency of the current systems to support the ever-growing data needs. This inefficiency is what led to the evolution of what we today know as Logical Data Lakes.

What Is a Logical Data Lake?

In simple words, a data lake is a data repository that is capable of storing any data in its original format. As opposed to traditional data sources that use the ETL (Extract, Transform, and Load) strategy, data lakes work on the ELT (Extract, Load, and Transform) strategy. This means data does not have to be first transformed and then loaded, which essentially translates into reduced time and efforts. Logical data lakes have captured the attention of millions as they do away with the need to integrate data from different data repositories. Thus, with this open access to data, companies can now begin to draw correlations between separate data entities and use this exercise to their advantage.

Primary Use Case Scenarios of Data Lakes

Logical data lakes are a relatively new concept, and thus, readers can benefit from some knowledge of how logical data lakes can be used in real-life scenarios.

To conduct Experimental Analysis of Data:

  • Logical data lakes can play an essential role in the experimental analysis of data to establish its value. Since data lakes work on the ELT strategy, they grant deftness and speed to processes during such experiments.

To store and analyze IoT Data:

  • Logical data lakes can efficiently store the Internet of Things type of data. Data lakes are capable of storing both relational as well as non-relational data. Under logical data lakes, it is not mandatory to define the structure or schema of the data stored. Moreover, logical data lakes can run analytics on IoT data and come up with ways to enhance quality and reduce operational cost.

To improve Customer Interaction:

  • Logical data lakes can methodically combine CRM data with social media analytics to give businesses an understanding of customer behavior as well as customer churn and its various causes.

To create a Data Warehouse:

  • Logical data lakes contain raw data. Data warehouses, on the other hand, store structured and filtered data. Creating a data lake is the first step in the process of data warehouse creation. A data lake may also be used to augment a data warehouse.

To support reporting and analytical function:

  • Data lakes can also be used to support the reporting and analytical function in organizations. By storing maximum data in a single repository, logical data lakes make it easier to analyze all data to come up with relevant and valuable findings.

A logical data lake is a comparatively new area of study. However, it can be said with certainty that logical data lakes will revolutionize the traditional data theories.

Related References

Netezza / PureData – How To Get A List Of When A Store Procedure Was Last Changed Or Created

Netezza / Puredata - SQL (Structured Query Language)
Netezza / Puredata – SQL (Structured Query Language)

In the continuing journey to track down impacted objects and to determine when the code in a database was last changed or added, here is another quick SQL, which can be used in Aginity Workbench for Netezza to retrieve a list of when Store Procedures were last updated or were created.

SQL List of When A Stored Procedure was Last Changed or Created

select t.database — Database
, t.OWNER — Object Owner
, t.PROCEDURE — Procedure Name
, o.objmodified — The Last Modified Datetime
, o.objcreated — Created Datetime

from _V_OBJECT o
, _v_procedure t
where
o.objid = t.objid
and t.DATABASE = ‘<<Database Name>>
order by o.objmodified Desc, o.objcreated Desc;

 

Related References

 

Netezza / PureData – How To Get a SQL List of When View Was Last Changed or Created

Netezza / PureData SQL (Structured Query Language)
Netezza / PureData SQL (Structured Query Language)

Sometimes it is handy to be able to get a quick list of when a view was changed last.  It could be for any number of reason, but sometimes folks just lose track of when a view was last updated or even need to verify that it hadn’t been changed recently.  So here is a quick SQL, which can be dropped in Aginity Workbench for Netezza to create a list of when a view was created or was update dated last.  Update the Database name in the SQL and run it.

SQL List of When A view was Last Changed or Created

select t.database — Database
, t.OWNER — Object Owner
, t.VIEWNAME — View Name
, o.objmodified — The Last Modified Datetime
, o.objcreated — Created Datetime

from _V_OBJECT o
,_V_VIEW_XDB t
where
o.objid = t.objid
and DATABASE = ‘<<Database Name>>
order by o.objcreated Desc, o.objmodified Desc;

Related References

 

Netezza / PureData – How To Quote a Single Quote in Netezza SQL

How To Quote a Single Quote in Netezza SQL?

The short answer is to use four single quotes (””), which will result in a single quote within the select statement results.

How to Assemble the SQL to Quote a Single Quote in a SQL Select Statement

Knowing how to construct a list to embed in a SQL where clause ‘in’ list or to add to an ETL job can be a serious time saver eliminating the need to manually edit large lists.  In the example below, I used the Select result set to create a rather long list of values, which needed to be included in an ELT where clause.  By:

  • Adding the comma delimiter (‘,’) and a Concatenate (||) on the front
  • Followed by adding a quoted single Quote (entered as four single quotes (””)) and a Concatenate (||)
  • The Field I which to have delaminated and Quoted (S1.ORDER_NUM)
  • And closed with a quoted single Quote (entered as four single quotes (””))

This results in a delimited and quoted list ( ,’116490856′) which needs only to have the parentheses added and the first comma removed, which is much less work than manually editing the 200 item that resulted from this select.

Example SQL:

SELECT Distinct

‘,’||””|| S1.ORDER_NUM||”” as Quoted_Order_Number

FROM Sales S1

How to Quote A Single Quote Example SQL
How to Quote A Single Quote Example SQL

Related Reference

Netezza / PureData – How to build a multi table drop command from a select

Database Management
Database Management

How to Quick Drop Multiple Tables

occasionally, there is a need to quickly drop a list of tables and you don’t always want to write or generate each command individually in Aginity.  So, here is a quick example of how you can use a ‘Select’ SQL statement to generate a list of drop commands for you. Now, this approach assumes there is a common naming convention, so, you may need to adapt it to your needs.

An outline of the Drop Multiple Tables Process

Here is a quick summary of the steps to generate the drop statements from _V_Table:

  1. Build required Netezza SQL select; paying particular attention to the where clause criteria to exclude any unnecessary tables.
  2. Execute the SQL statement
  3. Copy from Aginity Results Tab without headers
  4. Past into new Aginity Query window
  5. validate that only the tables are in the list — No extras
  6. Click with the SQL Drop command list and Execute as a single batch

Example generate the drop statements

select  ‘Drop table ‘||tablename||’;’

from _V_TABLE

where tablename like ‘NZCC_TT_%’;

 

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center > PureData System for Analytics 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation > Netezza SQL command reference > Drop Table

How to know if your Oracle Client install is 32 Bit or 64 Bit

Oracle Database, How to know if your Oracle Client install is 32 Bit or 64 Bit
Oracle Database

 

How to know if your Oracle Client install is 32 Bit or 64 Bit

Sometimes you just need to know if your Oracle Client install is 32 bit or 64 bit. But how do you figure that out? Here are two methods you can try.

The first method

Go to the %ORACLE_HOME%\inventory\ContentsXML folder and open the comps.xml file.
Look for <DEP_LIST> on the ~second screen.

If you see this: PLAT=”NT_AMD64” then your Oracle Home is 64 bit
If you see this: PLAT=”NT_X86” then your Oracle Home is 32 bit.

It is possible to have both the 32-bit and the 64-bit Oracle Homes installed.

The second method

This method is a bit faster. Windows has a different lib directory for 32-bit and 64-bit software. If you look under the ORACLE_HOME folder if you see a “lib” AND a “lib32” folder you have a 64 bit Oracle Client. If you see just the “lib” folder you’ve got a 32 bit Oracle Client.

Related References

 

OLTP vs Data Warehousing

OLTP Versus Data Warehousing

I’ve tried to explain the difference between OLTP systems and a Data Warehouse to my managers many times, as I’ve worked at a hospital as a Data Warehouse Manager/data analyst for many years. Why was the list that came from the operational applications different than the one that came from the Data Warehouse? Why couldn’t I just get a list of patients that were laying in the hospital right now from the Data Warehouse? So I explained, and explained again, and explained to another manager, and another. You get the picture.
In this article I will explain this very same thing to you. So you know  how to explain this to your manager. Or, if you are a manager, you might understand what your data analyst can and cannot give you.

OLTP

OLTP stands for OLine Transactional Processing. With other words: getting your data directly from the operational systems to make reports. An operational system is a system that is used for the day to day processes.
For example: When a patient checks in, his or her information gets entered into a Patient Information System. The doctor put scheduled tests, a diagnoses and a treatment plan in there as well. Doctors, nurses and other people working with patients use this system on a daily basis to enter and get detailed information on their patients.
The way the data is stored within operational systems is so the data can be used efficiently by the people working directly on the product, or with the patient in this case.

Data Warehousing

A Data Warehouse is a big database that fills itself with data from operational systems. It is used solely for reporting and analytical purposes. No one uses this data for day to day operations. The beauty of a Data Warehouse is, among others, that you can combine the data from the different operational systems. You can actually combine the number of patients in a department with the number of nurses for example. You can see how far a doctor is behind schedule and find the cause of that by looking at the patients. Does he run late with elderly patients? Is there a particular diagnoses that takes more time? Or does he just oversleep a lot? You can use this information to look at the past, see trends, so you can plan for the future.

The difference between OLTP and Data Warehousing

This is how a Data Warehouse works:

The data gets entered into the operational systems. Then the ETL processes Extract this data from these systems, Transforms the data so it will fit neatly into the Data Warehouse, and then Loads it into the Data Warehouse. After that reports are formed with a reporting tool, from the data that lies in the Data Warehouse.

This is how OLTP works:

Reports are directly made from the data inside the database of the operational systems. Some operational systems come with their own reporting tool, but you can always use a standalone reporting tool to make reports form the operational databases.

Pro’s and Con’s

Data Warehousing

Pro’s:

  • There is no strain on the operational systems during business hours
    • As you can schedule the ETL processes to run during the hours the least amount of people are using the operational system, you won’t disturb the operational processes. And when you need to run a large query, the operational systems won’t be affected, as you are working directly on the Data Warehouse database.
  • Data from different systems can be combined
    • It is possible to combine finance and productivity data for example. As the ETL process transforms the data so it can be combined.
  • Data is optimized for making queries and reports
    • You use different data in reports than you use on a day to day base. A Data Warehouse is built for this. For instance: most Data Warehouses have a separate date table where the weekday, day, month and year is saved. You can make a query to derive the weekday from a date, but that takes processing time. By using a separate table like this you’ll save time and decrease the strain on the database.
  • Data is saved longer than in the source systems
    • The source systems need to have their old records deleted when they are no longer used in the day to day operations. So they get deleted to gain performance.

Con’s:

  • You always look at the past
    • A Data Warehouse is updated once a night, or even just once a week. That means that you never have the latest data. Staying with the hospital example: you never knew how many patients are in the hospital are right now. Or what surgeon didn’t show up on time this morning.
  • You don’t have all the data
    • A Data Warehouse is built for discovering trends, showing the big picture. The little details, the ones not used in trends, get discarded during the ETL process.
  • Data isn’t the same as the data in the source systems
    • Because the data is older than those of the source systems it will always be a little different. But also because of the Transformation step in the ETL process, data will be a little different. It doesn’t mean one or the other is wrong. It’s just a different way of looking at the data. For example: the Data Warehouse at the hospital excluded all transactions that were marked as cancelled. If you try to get the same reports from both systems, and don’t exclude the cancelled transactions in the source system, you’ll get different results.

online transactional processing (OLTP)

Pro’s

  • You get real time data
    • If someone is entering a new record now, you’ll see it right away in your report. No delays.
  • You’ve got all the details
    • You have access to all the details that the employees have entered into the system. No grouping, no skipping records, just all the raw data that’s available.

Con’s

  • You are putting strain on an application during business hours.
    • When you are making a large query, you can take processing space that would otherwise be available to the people that need to work with this system for their day to day operations. And if you make an error, by for instance forgetting to put a date filter on your query, you could even bring the system down so no one can use it anymore.
  • You can’t compare the data with data from other sources.
    • Even when the systems are similar. Like an HR system and a payroll system that use each other to work. Data is always going to be different because it is granulated on a different level, or not all data is relevant for both systems.
  • You don’t have access to old data
    • To keep the applications at peak performance, old data, that’s irrelevant to day to day operations is deleted.
  • Data is optimized to suit day to day operations
    • And not for report making. This means you’ll have to get creative with your queries to get the data you need.

So what method should you use?

That all depends on what you need at that moment. If you need detailed information about things that are happening now, you should use OLTP.
If you are looking for trends, or insights on a higher level, you should use a Data Warehouse.

 Related References