Oracle Express Edition Error – ORA-65096: invalid common user or role name

While trying to create user in Oracle Database 18c Express Edition I kept getting an “ORA-65096: invalid common user or role name” error, which didn’t make sense to me so after validating my command, that I was signed in as an admin user, and determining that my “CREATE USER” was formatted correctly.  I did some additional research and determined that in the hidden parameter “_ORACLE_SCRIPT” needed to be set to “True” starting with the Oracle Version 12c and higher.

Setting the “_ORACLE_SCRIPT” values

To set the “_ORACLE_SCRIPT” hidden variable to “True” you need to run an “Alter” command. Then you will be able to create the desired user and run your grants commands as usual.

Alter SQL Command

alter session set “_oracle_script”=true;

How to Determine Your Oracle Database Name

Oracle provides a few ways to determine which database you are working in.  Admittedly, I usually know which database I’m working in, but recently I did an Oracle Database Express Edition (XE) install which did not goes has expected and I had reason to confirm which database I was actually in when the SQL*Plus session opened.  So, this lead me to consider how one would prove exactly which database they were connected to.  As it happens, Oracle has a few ways to quickly display which database you are connected to and here are two easy ways to find out your Oracle database name in SQL*Plus:

  • V$DATABASE
  • GLOBAL_NAME

Checking the GLOBAL_NAME table

The First method is to run a quick-select against the GLOBAL_NAME table, which. is publicly available to logged-in users of the database

Example GLOBAL_NAME Select Statement

select * from global_name;

Checking the V$DATABASE Variable

The second method is to run a quick-select a V$database. However, not everyone will have access to the V$database variable.

Example V$database Select Statement

select name from V$database;

Essbase Connector Error – Client Commands are Currently Not Being Accepted

DataStage Essbase Connector, Essbase Connector Error, Client Commands are Currently Not Being Accepted
DataStage Essbase Connector

While investigating a recent Infosphere Information Server (IIS), Datastage, Essbase Connect error I found the explanations of the probable causes of the error not to be terribly meaningful.  So, now that I have run our error to ground, I thought it might be nice to jot down a quick note of the potential cause of the ‘Client Commands are Currently Not Being Accepted’ error, which I gleaned from the process.

Error Message Id

  • IIS-CONN-ESSBASE-01010

Error Message

An error occurred while processing the request on the server. The error information is 1051544 (message on contacting or from application:[<<DateTimeStamp>>]Local////3544/Error(1013204) Client Commands are Currently Not Being Accepted.

Possible Causes of The Error

This Error is a problem with access to the Essbase object or accessing the security within the Essbase Object.  This can be a result of multiple issues, such as:

  • Object doesn’t exist – The Essbase object didn’t exist in the location specified,
  • Communications – the location is unavailable or cannot be reached,
  • Path Security – Security gets in the way to access the Essbase object location
  • Essbase Security – Security within the Essbase object does not support the user or filter being submitted. Also, the Essbase object security may be corrupted or incomplete.
  • Essbase Object Structure –  the Essbase object was not properly structured to support the filter or the Essbase filter is malformed for the current structure.

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center, InfoSphere Information Server 11.7.0, Connecting to data sources, Enterprise applications, IBM InfoSphere Information Server Pack for Hyperion Essbase

Printable PDF Version of This Article

 

DataStage – How to use single quoted parameter list in an Oracle Connector

Data Integration
Data Integration

While working with a client’s 9.1 DataStage version, I ran into a situation where they wanted to parameterize SQL where clause lists in an Oracle Connector stage, which honestly was not very straight forward to figure out.  First, if the APT_OSL_PARAM_ESC_SQUOTE is not set and single quotes are used in the parameter, the job creates unquoted invalid SQL when the parameter is populated.  Second, I found much of the information confusing and/or incomplete in its explanation.   After some research and some trial and error, here is how I resolved the issue.  I’ll endeavor to be concise, but holistic in my explanation.

When this Variable applies

This where I know this process applies, there may be other circumstances to which is this applicable, but I’m listing the ones here with which I have recent experience.

Infosphere Information Server Datastage

  • Versions 91, 11.3, and 11.5

Oracle RDBMS

  • Versions 11g and 12c

Configurations process

Here is a brief explanation of the steps I used to implement the where clause as a parameter.  Please note that in this example, I am using a job parameter to populate on a portion of the where clause, you can certainly pass the entire where clause as a parameter, if it is not too long.

Configure Project Variable in Administrator

  • Add APT_OSL_PARAM_ESC_SQUOTE to project in Administrator
  • Populate the APT_OSL_PARAM_ESC_SQUOTE Variable \

APT_OSL_PARAM_ESC_SQUOTE Project Variable
APT_OSL_PARAM_ESC_SQUOTE Project Variable

Create job parameter

Following your project name convention or standard practice, if you customer and/or project do not have established naming conventions, create the job parameter in the job. See jp_ItemSource parameter in the image below.

Job Parameter In Oracle Connector
Job Parameter In Oracle Connector

Add job parameter to Custom SQL in Select Oracle Connector Stage

On the Job parameter has been created, add the job parameter to the SQL statement of the job.

Job Parameter In SQL
Job Parameter In SQL

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center > InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0

Connecting to data sources > Databases > Oracle databases > Oracle connector

IBM Support > Limitation of the Parameter APT_OSL_PARAM_ESC_SQUOTE on Plugins on Parallel Canvas

IBM Knowledge Center > InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0

InfoSphere DataStage and Quality > Stage > Reference > Parallel Job Reference > Environment Variables > Miscellaneous > APT_OSL_PARAM_ESC_SQUOTE

 

How to know if your Oracle Client install is 32 Bit or 64 Bit

Oracle Database, How to know if your Oracle Client install is 32 Bit or 64 Bit
Oracle Database

 

How to know if your Oracle Client install is 32 Bit or 64 Bit

Sometimes you just need to know if your Oracle Client install is 32 bit or 64 bit. But how do you figure that out? Here are two methods you can try.

The first method

Go to the %ORACLE_HOME%\inventory\ContentsXML folder and open the comps.xml file.
Look for <DEP_LIST> on the ~second screen.

If you see this: PLAT=”NT_AMD64” then your Oracle Home is 64 bit
If you see this: PLAT=”NT_X86” then your Oracle Home is 32 bit.

It is possible to have both the 32-bit and the 64-bit Oracle Homes installed.

The second method

This method is a bit faster. Windows has a different lib directory for 32-bit and 64-bit software. If you look under the ORACLE_HOME folder if you see a “lib” AND a “lib32” folder you have a 64 bit Oracle Client. If you see just the “lib” folder you’ve got a 32 bit Oracle Client.

Related References

 

OLTP vs Data Warehousing

OLTP Versus Data Warehousing

I’ve tried to explain the difference between OLTP systems and a Data Warehouse to my managers many times, as I’ve worked at a hospital as a Data Warehouse Manager/data analyst for many years. Why was the list that came from the operational applications different than the one that came from the Data Warehouse? Why couldn’t I just get a list of patients that were laying in the hospital right now from the Data Warehouse? So I explained, and explained again, and explained to another manager, and another. You get the picture.
In this article I will explain this very same thing to you. So you know  how to explain this to your manager. Or, if you are a manager, you might understand what your data analyst can and cannot give you.

OLTP

OLTP stands for OLine Transactional Processing. With other words: getting your data directly from the operational systems to make reports. An operational system is a system that is used for the day to day processes.
For example: When a patient checks in, his or her information gets entered into a Patient Information System. The doctor put scheduled tests, a diagnoses and a treatment plan in there as well. Doctors, nurses and other people working with patients use this system on a daily basis to enter and get detailed information on their patients.
The way the data is stored within operational systems is so the data can be used efficiently by the people working directly on the product, or with the patient in this case.

Data Warehousing

A Data Warehouse is a big database that fills itself with data from operational systems. It is used solely for reporting and analytical purposes. No one uses this data for day to day operations. The beauty of a Data Warehouse is, among others, that you can combine the data from the different operational systems. You can actually combine the number of patients in a department with the number of nurses for example. You can see how far a doctor is behind schedule and find the cause of that by looking at the patients. Does he run late with elderly patients? Is there a particular diagnoses that takes more time? Or does he just oversleep a lot? You can use this information to look at the past, see trends, so you can plan for the future.

The difference between OLTP and Data Warehousing

This is how a Data Warehouse works:

The data gets entered into the operational systems. Then the ETL processes Extract this data from these systems, Transforms the data so it will fit neatly into the Data Warehouse, and then Loads it into the Data Warehouse. After that reports are formed with a reporting tool, from the data that lies in the Data Warehouse.

This is how OLTP works:

Reports are directly made from the data inside the database of the operational systems. Some operational systems come with their own reporting tool, but you can always use a standalone reporting tool to make reports form the operational databases.

Pro’s and Con’s

Data Warehousing

Pro’s:

  • There is no strain on the operational systems during business hours
    • As you can schedule the ETL processes to run during the hours the least amount of people are using the operational system, you won’t disturb the operational processes. And when you need to run a large query, the operational systems won’t be affected, as you are working directly on the Data Warehouse database.
  • Data from different systems can be combined
    • It is possible to combine finance and productivity data for example. As the ETL process transforms the data so it can be combined.
  • Data is optimized for making queries and reports
    • You use different data in reports than you use on a day to day base. A Data Warehouse is built for this. For instance: most Data Warehouses have a separate date table where the weekday, day, month and year is saved. You can make a query to derive the weekday from a date, but that takes processing time. By using a separate table like this you’ll save time and decrease the strain on the database.
  • Data is saved longer than in the source systems
    • The source systems need to have their old records deleted when they are no longer used in the day to day operations. So they get deleted to gain performance.

Con’s:

  • You always look at the past
    • A Data Warehouse is updated once a night, or even just once a week. That means that you never have the latest data. Staying with the hospital example: you never knew how many patients are in the hospital are right now. Or what surgeon didn’t show up on time this morning.
  • You don’t have all the data
    • A Data Warehouse is built for discovering trends, showing the big picture. The little details, the ones not used in trends, get discarded during the ETL process.
  • Data isn’t the same as the data in the source systems
    • Because the data is older than those of the source systems it will always be a little different. But also because of the Transformation step in the ETL process, data will be a little different. It doesn’t mean one or the other is wrong. It’s just a different way of looking at the data. For example: the Data Warehouse at the hospital excluded all transactions that were marked as cancelled. If you try to get the same reports from both systems, and don’t exclude the cancelled transactions in the source system, you’ll get different results.

online transactional processing (OLTP)

Pro’s

  • You get real time data
    • If someone is entering a new record now, you’ll see it right away in your report. No delays.
  • You’ve got all the details
    • You have access to all the details that the employees have entered into the system. No grouping, no skipping records, just all the raw data that’s available.

Con’s

  • You are putting strain on an application during business hours.
    • When you are making a large query, you can take processing space that would otherwise be available to the people that need to work with this system for their day to day operations. And if you make an error, by for instance forgetting to put a date filter on your query, you could even bring the system down so no one can use it anymore.
  • You can’t compare the data with data from other sources.
    • Even when the systems are similar. Like an HR system and a payroll system that use each other to work. Data is always going to be different because it is granulated on a different level, or not all data is relevant for both systems.
  • You don’t have access to old data
    • To keep the applications at peak performance, old data, that’s irrelevant to day to day operations is deleted.
  • Data is optimized to suit day to day operations
    • And not for report making. This means you’ll have to get creative with your queries to get the data you need.

So what method should you use?

That all depends on what you need at that moment. If you need detailed information about things that are happening now, you should use OLTP.
If you are looking for trends, or insights on a higher level, you should use a Data Warehouse.

 Related References

Oracle – How to get a list of user permission grants

IBM Infosphere Information Server (IIS), Oracle – How to get a list of user permission grants
IBM Infosphere Information Server (IIS)

Since the Infosphere, information server, repository, has to be installed manually with the scripts provided in the IBM software, sometimes you run into difficulties. So, here’s a quick script, which I have found useful in the past to identify user permissions for the IAUSER on Oracle database’s to help rundown discrepancies in user permissions.

 

SELECT *

FROM ALL_TAB_PRIVS

WHERE  GRANTEE = ‘iauser’

 

If we cannot run against the ALL_TAB_PRIVS view, then we can try the ALL_TAB_PRIVS view:

 

SELECT *

FROM USER_TAB_PRIVS

WHERE  GRANTEE = ‘iauser’

 

Related References

oracle help Center > Database Reference > ALL_TAB_PRIVS view