Oracle Express Edition Error – ORA-65096: invalid common user or role name

While trying to create user in Oracle Database 18c Express Edition I kept getting an “ORA-65096: invalid common user or role name” error, which didn’t make sense to me so after validating my command, that I was signed in as an admin user, and determining that my “CREATE USER” was formatted correctly.  I did some additional research and determined that in the hidden parameter “_ORACLE_SCRIPT” needed to be set to “True” starting with the Oracle Version 12c and higher.

Setting the “_ORACLE_SCRIPT” values

To set the “_ORACLE_SCRIPT” hidden variable to “True” you need to run an “Alter” command. Then you will be able to create the desired user and run your grants commands as usual.

Alter SQL Command

alter session set “_oracle_script”=true;

How to Determine Your Oracle Database Name

Oracle provides a few ways to determine which database you are working in.  Admittedly, I usually know which database I’m working in, but recently I did an Oracle Database Express Edition (XE) install which did not goes has expected and I had reason to confirm which database I was actually in when the SQL*Plus session opened.  So, this lead me to consider how one would prove exactly which database they were connected to.  As it happens, Oracle has a few ways to quickly display which database you are connected to and here are two easy ways to find out your Oracle database name in SQL*Plus:

  • V$DATABASE
  • GLOBAL_NAME

Checking the GLOBAL_NAME table

The First method is to run a quick-select against the GLOBAL_NAME table, which. is publicly available to logged-in users of the database

Example GLOBAL_NAME Select Statement

select * from global_name;

Checking the V$DATABASE Variable

The second method is to run a quick-select a V$database. However, not everyone will have access to the V$database variable.

Example V$database Select Statement

select name from V$database;

Netezza / PureData – How to Substring on a Character

PureData Powered by Netezza
PureData Powered by Netezza

 

I had a reason this week to perform a substring on a character in Netezza this week, something I have not had a need to do before.  The process was not as straightforward as I would have thought, since the command is explained as a static position command, and the IBM documentation, honestly, wasn’t much help.  Knowing full well, that text strings are variable having to provide a static position is not terribly useful in and of itself.  So, we need to use an expression to make the substring command flexible and dynamic.

I did get it work the way I needed, but it took two commands to make it happen:

  • The First was the ’instr’ command to identify the field and character I wanted to substring on: instr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,’~’) as This provides the position number of the tilde (~).
  • The second was the ‘substr’ command in which I embedded the ‘instr’ command: substr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,0,instr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,’~’) )

This worked nicely for what I needed, which was to pick out a file name from the beginning of a string, which was delimited with a tilde (~)

Substring on a Character Command Format

  • This format example starts with position zero (0) as position 1 of substring command and goes to the first tilde (~) as position 2 of the substring command.
Select  <<FIELD_NAME>>

, instr(<>,’~’) as pos2

, substr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,0,instr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,’~’) ) as Results

From <<Table_Name>>

where  <<Where_Clause>>;

 

 

Related references

IBM Knowledge Center, Home, PureData System for Analytics 7.2.1, IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL basics, Netezza SQL extensions, Character string functions

IBM Knowledge Center, Home PureData System for Analytics 7.0.3, IBM Netezza Database User’s Guide, Netezza SQL basics, Netezza SQL extensions, Character functions

Oracle TO_CHAR to SQL Server CONVERT Equivalents to change Date to String

Transact SQL (T-SQL)
Transact SQL (T-SQL)

When it comes to SQL I tend to lean on the SQL I have used the most over the years, which is Oracle.  Today was no exception, I found myself trying to use the TO_CHAR command in SQL Server to format a date, which of course does not work. So, after a little thought, here are some examples of how you can the SQL Server Convert Command the achieve the equivalent result.

Example SQL Server Date Conversion SQL
Example SQL Server Date Conversion SQL

Example SQL Server Date Conversion SQL Code

This SQL of examples runs, as is, no from table required.

 

Select

CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), GETDATE(), 20) as
‘YYYY-MM-DD’

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(19), GETDATE(), 20) as ‘YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS’

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(8), GETDATE(), 112) as YYYYMMDD

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(6), GETDATE(), 112) as YYYYMM

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(12), DATEPART(YEAR, GETDATE()))+ RIGHT(‘0’+CAST(MONTH(GETDATE()) AS VARCHAR(2)),2)
as
YYYYMM_Method_2

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(4), GETDATE(), 12) as YYMM

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(4), GETDATE(), 112) as YYYY

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(4), DATEPART(YEAR, GETDATE())) as YYYY_Method_2

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(4), YEAR(GETDATE())) as YYYY_Method_3

,RIGHT(‘0’+CAST(MONTH(GETDATE()) AS VARCHAR(2)),2) as Two_Digit_Month

,SUBSTRING(ltrim(CONVERT(VARCHAR(4), GETDATE(), 12)),3,2) as Two_Digit_Month_2

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), GETDATE(), 111) as ‘YYYY/MM/DD’

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(5), GETDATE(), 8) as ‘HH24:MI’

,CONVERT(VARCHAR(8), GETDATE(), 8) ‘HH24:MI:SS’

 

Map TO_CHAR formats to SQL Server

You can map an Oracle TO_CHAR formats to SQL Server alternative commands as follows:

TO_CHAR
String

VARCHAR
Length

SQL
Server Convert Style

YYYY-MM-DD

VARCHAR(10)

20,
21, 120, 121, 126 and 127

YYYY-MM-DD
HH24:MI:SS

VARCHAR(19)

20,
21, 120 and 121

YYYYMMDD

VARCHAR(8)

112

YYYYMM

VARCHAR(6)

112

YYMM

VARCHAR(4)

12

YYYY

VARCHAR(4)

112

MM

VARCHAR(2)

12

YYYY/MM/DD

VARCHAR(10)

111

HH24:MI

VARCHAR(5)

8,
108, 14 and 114

HH24:MI:SS

VARCHAR(8)

8,
108, 14 and 114

Translating the formats commands

Here are some example of translating the formats commands.

Format

SQL
Server

YYYY-MM-DD

CONVERT(VARCHAR(10),
GETDATE(), 20)

YYYY-MM-DD
HH24:MI:SS

CONVERT(VARCHAR(19),
GETDATE(), 20)

YYYYMMDD

CONVERT(VARCHAR(8),
GETDATE(), 112)

YYYYMM

CONVERT(VARCHAR(6),
GETDATE(), 112)

YYMM

CONVERT(VARCHAR(4),
GETDATE(), 12)

YYYY

CONVERT(VARCHAR(4),
GETDATE(), 112)

YYYY

CONVERT(VARCHAR(4),
DATEPART(YEAR, GETDATE()))

YYYY

CONVERT(VARCHAR(4),
YEAR(GETDATE()))

MM

RIGHT(‘0’+CAST(MONTH(GETDATE())
AS VARCHAR(2)),2)

MM

SUBSTRING(ltrim(CONVERT(VARCHAR(4),
GETDATE(), 12)),3,2)

YYYY/MM/DD

CONVERT(VARCHAR(10),
GETDATE(), 111)

HH24:MI

CONVERT(VARCHAR(5),
GETDATE(), 8)

HH24:MI:SS

CONVERT(VARCHAR(8),
GETDATE(), 8)

Related Reference

Microsoft Docs, SQL, T-SQL Functions, GETDATE (Transact-SQL)

Microsoft Docs, SQL, T-SQL Functions, Date and Time Data Types and Functions (Transact-SQL)

Microsoft Docs, SQL, T-SQL Functions, DATEPART (Transact-SQL)

SQL server table Describe (DESC) equivalent

Transact SQL (T-SQL)
Transact SQL (T-SQL)

Microsoft SQL Server doesn’t seem have a describe command and usually, folks seem to want to build a stored procedure to get the describe behaviors.  However, this is not always practical based on your permissions. So, the simple SQL below will provide describe like information in a pinch.  You may want to dress it up a bit; but I usually just use it raw, as shown below by adding the table name.

Describe T-SQL Equivalent

Select *

 

From INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS

Where TABLE_NAME = ‘<<TABLENAME>>’;

Related References

Microsoft SQL Server – Useful links

Microsoft SQL Server 2017
Microsoft SQL Server 2017

Here are a few references for the Microsoft SQL Server 2017 database, which may be helpful.

Table Of Useful Microsoft SQL Server Database References

Reference Type

Link

SQL Server 2017 Download Page

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/sql-server/sql-server-downloads

SQL SERVER version, edition, and update level

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/321185/how-to-determine-the-version–edition-and-update-level-of-sql-server-a

SQL Server 2017 Release Notes

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/sql-server/sql-server-2017-release-notes

SQL Server Transact SQL Commands

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189826(v=sql.90).aspx

Related References

Netezza / PureData – How To Get A List Of When A Store Procedure Was Last Changed Or Created

Netezza / Puredata - SQL (Structured Query Language)
Netezza / Puredata – SQL (Structured Query Language)

In the continuing journey to track down impacted objects and to determine when the code in a database was last changed or added, here is another quick SQL, which can be used in Aginity Workbench for Netezza to retrieve a list of when Store Procedures were last updated or were created.

SQL List of When A Stored Procedure was Last Changed or Created

select t.database — Database
, t.OWNER — Object Owner
, t.PROCEDURE — Procedure Name
, o.objmodified — The Last Modified Datetime
, o.objcreated — Created Datetime

from _V_OBJECT o
, _v_procedure t
where
o.objid = t.objid
and t.DATABASE = ‘<<Database Name>>
order by o.objmodified Desc, o.objcreated Desc;

 

Related References