What is AIX?

AIX (Advanced Interactive eXecutive) is an operating system developed by IBM for business all across the world that needs data metrics that can keep up with the ever-changing scope of business in today’s world. AIX is a version of UNIX. AIX is designed to work on a number of computer platforms from the same manufacturer. On its launch, the system was designed for IBM’s RT PC RISC workstation.

User interface

AIX was developed with Bourne Shell as the default shell for three versions of the OS. Afterwards, it was changed to KornShell going forward from version 4. The OS uses Common Desktop Environment (CDE) as the default user interface for graphics. The System Management Interface Tool on the OS allows users to access the menu using a hierarchy of commands instead of the command line. 

Compatible systems

The operating system works on a number of hardware platforms. The initial OS was designed for the IBM RT PC and used a microkernel that controlled the mouse, disk drives, keyboard, and display. This allowed users to use all these components between operating systems by the use of a hot key-the alt+tab combination. The OS was also fitted on newer systems such as the IBM PS/2 series, IDM mainframes, AI-64 systems and can also be used with the Apple’s server network. AIX is commonly used on IBM’s 64-bit POWER processor and systems. AIX can run most Linux applications (after recompiling) and has full support for Java 2.

Since its introduction to computer infrastructure, the operating system has undergone a lot of upgrades with five versions released since 2001. The latest version of the software is the AIX 7.2. All of these come with a high tech security system and fast uptimes.

As an operating system AIX has become popular with students who learn quickly by working on AIX projects live. Working professionals have also been attracted by the dependability of the system and the intuitive that is part of its design.

Related References

8 Most Useful Linux Commands For Beginners

Do you think that the command lines are an old-fashion leftover from previous decades or an antiquated way of using a PC? Think again. Indeed, it is one of the most powerful and flexible ways to perform and manage in Linux. If you come from the comfort of a Mac or Window desktop, however, it can be a bit intimidating to get used to Linux commands. Everything is secretive, dark, and anything but friendly to beginners. That’s why we have rounded up this short list of the most useful Linux commands with examples. Keep reading and speed up your learning journey with Linux.

1. Ls command – list files

Ls is one of the most basic and common commands in Linux. You can use it to print contents in the current working directory and see the list of files, directories, or folders on your Linux system.
For instance, the command “ls tourism” will display the users every folder store inside the overall “tourism” folder. Keep in mind that directories and files will be denoted in different colors, which can be selected in the system.
You would also use the command “ls – R” to display all files both in the directories and subdirectories. Since Linux commands are case sensitive, make sure to enter “R” instead of “r” to avoid an error.

2. Cat command – create and view files

You can use the “cat” command to show text files. Also, it would be used for creating, combining, and copying text files. For example, use “cat linux_tip” to get inside the linux_tip file and read its contents on the screen.
To combine two text files “linux_tip_1” and “linux_tip_2, you can enter the following command “cat linux_tip_1 linux_tip_2 > linux_tip”. Keep in mind that only text documents would be combined and shown with this command.

3. Rm command – delete files

The “Rm” command can be used for removing files or directories from your Linux system without confirmation. The syntax is simple “Rm name_deleted_file.”
For example, the command “rm computer_science” will immediately remove the file or directory named “computer_science” from your computer. Make sure to consider carefully before using this command because you cannot get it back.

4. Mv command – move and rename files

To move and rename files, the “mv” command will be used. Here is the basic syntax for this task: “mv filename new_location.”
Suppose that you need to move the file name “english_class” to location “/home/school/documents”, just enter the command “mv english_class /home/school/documents.” Keep in mind that this command requires the permission of users.
The syntax for renaming a file is “mv filename newname”. An example command is “mv english_class french_class”

5. Mkdir – create directories

If you want to create a new directory in your Linux system, then you can use the “mkdir” command. The syntax is “mkdir new_directory.”
For instance, you can create a new directory named “final homework” by typing the following command “mkdir final_homework.” In case you do not want to make a parent directory manually, add the -p argument. Keep in mind that it is -p, not -P. Everything in Linux is case sensitive.

6. Rmdir command – remove directories

In contrast with the mkdir command, you can use the rmdir command to remove a directory. The syntax is similar: “rmdir removed_directory.”
If you enter the following command “rmdir basketball_data”, it will immediately delete the directory named “basketball_data”. Always check carefully to make sure that there is no sub-directory or file under the deleted directory. If possible, it is always better to delete the sub-directory or files first before moving to the parent one.

7. Man command – seek help in Linux

“Man” simply stands for manual. You can use this command to access a reference book of the Linux system, which is quite similar to the “Help” file in many popular applications or software. To seek help on any commands that you don’t understand, just enter “ma command_name”. The terminal will open a manual page for the typed command.
For example, if you enter “man ls”, the terminal will provide you with basic information on the “ls” command.

8. History command – view previous commands

As you can guess from the name, the “history” command can be used to display all of the commands that you just used previously for the current session. This can be helpful in referring to the old commands and re-entering or re-using them in the next operations.

Related References

End Of Support For IBM InfoSphere 9.1.0

IBM Information Server (IIS)
IBM Information Server (IIS)

End of Support for IBM InfoSphere Information Server 9.1.0

IBM InfoSphere Information Server 9.1.0 will reach End of Support on 2018-09-30.  If you are still on the InfoSphere Information Server (IIS) 9.1.0, I hope you have a plan to migrate to an 11-series version soon.  InfoSphere Information Server (IIS) 11.7 would be worth considering if you don’t already own an 11-series license. InfoSphere Information Server (IIS) 11.7 will allow you to take advantage of the evolving thin client tools and other capabilities in the 2018 release pipeline without needing to perform another upgrade.

Related References

IBM Support, End of support notification: InfoSphere Information Server 9.1.0

IBM Support, Software lifecycle, InfoSphere Information Server 9.1.0

IBM Knowledge Center, Home, InfoSphere Information Server 11.7.0, IBM InfoSphere Information Server Version 11.7.0 documentation

What Is Machine Learning?

Machine Learning
Machine Learning

Machine learning is Artificial Intelligence (AI) which enables a system to learn from data rather than through explicit programming.  Machine learning uses algorithms that iteratively learn from data to improve, describe data, and predict outcomes.  As the algorithms ingest training data to produce a more precise machine learning model. Once trained, the machine learning model, when provided data will generate predictions based on the data that taught the model.  Machine learning is a crucial ingredient for creating modern analytics models.

Netezza / PureData – How to Substring on a Character

PureData Powered by Netezza
PureData Powered by Netezza

 

I had a reason this week to perform a substring on a character in Netezza this week, something I have not had a need to do before.  The process was not as straightforward as I would have thought, since the command is explained as a static position command, and the IBM documentation, honestly, wasn’t much help.  Knowing full well, that text strings are variable having to provide a static position is not terribly useful in and of itself.  So, we need to use an expression to make the substring command flexible and dynamic.

I did get it work the way I needed, but it took two commands to make it happen:

  • The First was the ’instr’ command to identify the field and character I wanted to substring on: instr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,’~’) as This provides the position number of the tilde (~).
  • The second was the ‘substr’ command in which I embedded the ‘instr’ command: substr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,0,instr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,’~’) )

This worked nicely for what I needed, which was to pick out a file name from the beginning of a string, which was delimited with a tilde (~)

Substring on a Character Command Format

  • This format example starts with position zero (0) as position 1 of substring command and goes to the first tilde (~) as position 2 of the substring command.
Select  <<FIELD_NAME>>

, instr(<>,’~’) as pos2

, substr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,0,instr(<<FIELD_NAME>>,’~’) ) as Results

From <<Table_Name>>

where  <<Where_Clause>>;

 

 

Related references

IBM Knowledge Center, Home, PureData System for Analytics 7.2.1, IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL basics, Netezza SQL extensions, Character string functions

IBM Knowledge Center, Home PureData System for Analytics 7.0.3, IBM Netezza Database User’s Guide, Netezza SQL basics, Netezza SQL extensions, Character functions

Essbase Connector Error – Client Commands are Currently Not Being Accepted

DataStage Essbase Connector, Essbase Connector Error, Client Commands are Currently Not Being Accepted
DataStage Essbase Connector

While investigating a recent Infosphere Information Server (IIS), Datastage, Essbase Connect error I found the explanations of the probable causes of the error not to be terribly meaningful.  So, now that I have run our error to ground, I thought it might be nice to jot down a quick note of the potential cause of the ‘Client Commands are Currently Not Being Accepted’ error, which I gleaned from the process.

Error Message Id

  • IIS-CONN-ESSBASE-01010

Error Message

An error occurred while processing the request on the server. The error information is 1051544 (message on contacting or from application:[<<DateTimeStamp>>]Local////3544/Error(1013204) Client Commands are Currently Not Being Accepted.

Possible Causes of The Error

This Error is a problem with access to the Essbase object or accessing the security within the Essbase Object.  This can be a result of multiple issues, such as:

  • Object doesn’t exist – The Essbase object didn’t exist in the location specified,
  • Communications – the location is unavailable or cannot be reached,
  • Path Security – Security gets in the way to access the Essbase object location
  • Essbase Security – Security within the Essbase object does not support the user or filter being submitted. Also, the Essbase object security may be corrupted or incomplete.
  • Essbase Object Structure –  the Essbase object was not properly structured to support the filter or the Essbase filter is malformed for the current structure.

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center, InfoSphere Information Server 11.7.0, Connecting to data sources, Enterprise applications, IBM InfoSphere Information Server Pack for Hyperion Essbase

Printable PDF Version of This Article

 

My Most Used Windows 10 Keyboard Shortcuts

Shortcut Keystrokes
Shortcut Keystrokes

While there are a great number of useful windows 10 shortcuts, I have the list below the combination, which I use daily.  Many of the shortcuts can be used across multiple applications (e.g. Notepad++, MS Word, SQL Server, Aginity, etc.) and save a considerable amount of mouse work.  Overall, these shortcut keys are more efficient and faster than using the mouse to perform the same task on a repetitive basis.

You may want to investigate the numerous other Windows 10 shortcuts keys, which best apply to your daily activities, but these are the ones, which I have found most useful and which I have committed to memory.

Table of My Most Used Windows Shortcuts

Key
Strokes

Behavior

Alt
+ Tab

Switch
between open apps

Ctrl
+ A

Select
all items in a document or window

Ctrl
+ Alt + Tab

Use
the arrow keys to switch between all open apps

Ctrl
+ C

Copy
the selected item

Ctrl
+ D

Delete
the selected item and move it to the Recycle Bin

Ctrl
+ F

Select
the search box

Ctrl
+ V

Paste
the selected item

Ctrl
+ X

Cut
the selected item

Esc

Stop
or leave the current task

F5

Refresh
the active window

F11

Maximize
Window

Related References

 Microsoft > Windows Support > Keyboard shortcuts in Windows